Mayweather Blinds Guerrero with Science

Landing more than 40% of his shots, Floyd’s unparalleled efficiency surfaced yet again.

Mayweather stood directly in front of Guerrero—making the early statement that he would not run and instead chose to stand and trade…

 

Floyd Mayweather (44-0) delivered another scintillating and clinical performance, dispatching Robert Guerrero (31-2-1, 18 KOs) in a one-sided fight that yet again provided empirical data to suggest that Mayweather’s undefeated record is not product of anything but his extensive dominance and ability to stay in a peaked prime for nearly two decades. Landing more than 40% of his shots, Mayweather’s unparalleled efficiency surfaced yet again as he outlanded Guerrero demonstrably, producing another glittery performance that has come to typify his unblemished career.

Guerrero came out gunslinging early, firing off a few left hands to the body as round 1 commenced. Mayweather stood directly in front of Guerrero—making the early statement that he would not run and instead chose to stand and trade. Determined to make it a rough fight, Guerrero landed some heavy shots on the inside and applied a spirited pugilistic effort.

Showing he was there to fight, Guerrero walked Mayweather into a corner at the beginning of round 2, and Floyd appeared to try and set counterpunching traps for Guerrero, who refused to bite. Instead, The Ghost landed solid body shots on the inside. Mayweather landed a sharp straight right hand, and Guerrero answered with a counter straight left hand of his own. Mayweather began to study Guerrero towards the latter part of the round, but while Floyd was studying, Guerrero was scoring.

Mayweather began to settle into a groove in round 3, timing Guerrero brilliantly and deftly slipping away before Guerrero could score. It was a very smooth round for Mayweather, while Guerrero was beginning to look jumbled from Mayweather’s science.

Floyd continued building upon his momentum in round 4, keeping the fight at the center of the ring, operating two times faster than Guerrero and pinpointing him with precise counter shots.

Mayweather marched on in round 5, peppering Guerrero with straight right hand leads. Guerrero’s willpower seemed to wane as Mayweather’s confidence and efficient utility was on the ascent. Mayweather continued to blind Guerrero with his science in round 6, as he fully settled into a rhythm to his liking, and Guerrero’s face began to break under the pressure.

Yet another pattern began to develop that is patently familiar to fight fans. Mayweather studies his opponent in the early rounds—takes his time—and then applies the knowledge learned through that study, solving his opponent at rapid speeds.

After a fairly quiet 7th, action picked up again in round 8 as Guerrero seemed to wake up after being stung with a blistering counter left hook. Guerrero landed some quality shots, but far too few as Mayweather’s confidence propelled him to land double and triple power shots to Guerrero’s low volume. Floyd backed Guerrero up into a corner as the round concluded, and for the first time in the fight Guerrero showed signs of quit, as Mayweather continued to whip him with thundering precision.

Mayweather’s science was on full display in round 9—firing off counter after counter begging Guerrero to initiate. To Guerrero’s credit, he was still trying to compete, but it was becoming abundantly clear that his toolbox was not varied enough to deal with the anomalous skill-set of Floyd Mayweather.

As the championship rounds materialized, Mayweather was striking Guerrero with cobra quickness, stinging him with counters at the exact moment Guerrero tried to launch offense. Guerrero would begin to throw and Mayweather would immediately counter before Guerrero could land anything. Instant replays provided proof of Mayweather’s unbelievable precision, placing punches with exquisite accuracy that were both substantive and flashy.

It was yet another mesmerizing performance for Mayweather, who served up sophisticated pugilism that would make any boxing purist beam with admiration. He said he was going to take his time. He did. He said he wasn’t Berto. He wasn’t. He was supremely confident throughout the pre-fight pageantry, and even more confident in the midst of the tornado, which he steered with unbreakable focus. Very few fighters can sit in the pocket and oscillate their auric field to find that perfect balance between utter rage and pure serenity, and Floyd Mayweather is one of them. Time and time again, he looked the storm directly in the eye, and overwhelmed it.

If this is what we can expect from Mayweather for the next 30 months, sign me up

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